What is Pre-Diabetes?

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What is Pre-Diabetes?

Pre-diabetes is sometimes seen as a blood sugar ‘no-mans land’ – that is, an individual’s blood sugars levels are not in the ‘normal’ range but equally are not of a level high enough to be considered fully ‘Type 2 Diabetic’.

It is seen as a tipping point; the point at which it should be a wake up call to make the changes required in one’s diet and lifestyle to reverse the trend – and, in more cases than not, implimenting changes will often take a person out of the pre-diabetic range and keep them there (if those changes become lifelong). Pre-diabetes is absolutely reversible.

Sadly, some people impliment enough change to reduce their blood sugars to take them out of the ‘danger zone’, but then once back in the ‘normal’ range, these good habits slip and the bad habits creep back in, and they find themselves back in the pre-diabetic range again, or worse.

One thing to note… without intervention on the part of the individual (either on their own, or with help), Type 2 Diabetes will almost certainly develop.

On a biological level, pre-diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to make effective use of insulin (insulin is a hormone (chemical messenger) produced by the pancreas, that helps to regulate our blood sugar levels).

This results in blood sugar levels remaining higher than is normal, which in turn can lead to damage to other systems of the body and to organs if left uncontrolled.

A person is considered by pre-diabetic if their fasting blood sugar is between 5.6mmol/l to 6.9mmol/l, or they have a HBA1C level of between 42 and 47.

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